When it comes to writing a tender response, writing a proposal or pitching your business, it’s easy to fall into the trap of talking all about you. But when you put on your tender writer or proposal writer hat, your writing needs to be all about the client. Here are five tips to maximise your tender or proposal’s chance of success:

1. Follow their structure

It’s important to follow the Request for Tender or Request for Proposal’s structure because then you will answer exactly what they want to know. It also shows you have taken the time to read the RFT carefully and that you can follow instructions. This is especially vital when you are tendering to government.

2. Include an engaging executive summary

An executive summary enables your prospect to gain an insight into everything you are presenting, and should be included with each tender or proposal. Use sub-headings for ease of reading, and leave it until last to write – it’s usually easier that way!

3. Make sure each paragraph is about them

The ideal way to begin each paragraph is with a strong statement about how you will help your prospective client. Tell them what’s in it for them in a compelling way.

4. Give an example after each point

Don’t simply tell them what you will do, show them as well by providing an example to support your statements. Industry statistics, future plans, and something you have already done will all work well here.

5. The detail’s in the appendix

Don’t lose your message in a sea of detail about your business, instead use an appendix to provide additional information – if the client wants it. Just make sure you accurately reference your appendices throughout your tender or proposal.

For some excellent tips on winning tenders, watch our short video at Tips for winning a proposal or tender

For expert advice and help on writing Tenders or any other B2B document, give Rosemary Gillespie a call on 02 8036 5532 or 0411 123 216 or head to the contact page.

Five Tips for Tender Writing Success was last modified on June 25th, 2017 by Proof Communications Author
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