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Blog was last modified on July 2nd, 2016 by Proof Communications Team
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Copy Editing Business Documents

Hot tips for copy editing your business documents

Copy editing your business documents is an essential part of the copywriting process. Copy editing is done after you finish your draft and if you think it’s not necessary, remember even the world’s bestselling authors have editors; they know how important it is to get their copy just right. Editing is different from proofreading, which is when you check your spelling, grammar and capitalisation, for example. Editing can be a more complex job than proofreading, but will improve your document…

Hot tips for copy editing your business documents was last modified on August 7th, 2016 by Proof Communications Author
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The Comma Sutra: How to use a comma

There’s nothing like a comma to tie you up in grammatical knots.  Sure, this cute, curvy symbol looks innocent enough, but behind its oh-so-deceptively simple style, this little baby has the power to take your sentence and give it a WHOLE new meaning.  If you don’t think commas are important, try forgetting one when you tell someone “I’m sorry, I love you.” Here are just a few of the ways in which commas come in really useful when you’re writing. Commas separate elements in a series  “Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, and Croatia…

The Comma Sutra: How to use a comma was last modified on July 30th, 2016 by Proof Communications Author
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Annual Report Mistakes

7 ways to avoid annual report writing mistakes

Around the start of a new financial year, the team at Proof Communications is asked to proofread annual reports and it’s always interesting to see how few typos we find. In a typical 150-page annual report, we usually find only a handful of spelling mistakes, even in the 50 pages or so of very dense, copy-heavy financial statements. What’s more usual is inconsistency in how phrases, titles or financial terms are presented. This is down to different writers’ input into…

7 ways to avoid annual report writing mistakes was last modified on July 19th, 2016 by Proof Communications Editor
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Win tender from big corporate

How an SME can win business from a big corporate (Part 2)

In Part 1, I discussed how large corporates do partner with small to medium business entities and how to start the process as an SME to win their business. But I left you at a critical point… What if you’re invited to tender? Private and listed companies generally issue requests for tender, pitch or proposal to a select few, so scoring an invitation to do so is your first challenge. Usually, those invited may have approached the company before; some…

How an SME can win business from a big corporate (Part 2) was last modified on July 7th, 2016 by Proof Communications Editor
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Win business from big corporates

How an SME can win business from a big corporate (Part 1)

To have a big four bank or any of the top 10 Australian listed companies as your customer would be considered a big feather in the cap of many a business, large or small. While procurement teams are busy balancing their internal clients’ needs against their employers’ budgets, it might seem like a mammoth task to win business from large and listed companies and government organisations. It might seem especially so for SMEs who often believe that such organisations will…

How an SME can win business from a big corporate (Part 1) was last modified on June 22nd, 2016 by Proof Communications Editor
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Best tip for business writing

Best ever tip for great business writing

Over the years I’ve been copywriting tenders and proposals and B2B content marketing, I’ve been conscious that when I’m editing I often move the last sentence in a paragraph up to become the first in that paragraph. It always seemed to me that copy made more sense if it were restructured in this way. Yet, in all this time, I never considered why I do this. But when I read an article on LinkedIn a few years back, it explained…

Best ever tip for great business writing was last modified on June 22nd, 2016 by Proof Communications Editor
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Avoid jargon in writing

Why you should avoid jargon in business writing

Do you ever get frustrated with jargon filled writing? Here’s what Barry Humphries had to say about jargon in The Spectator back in 2012. “Soap is now a cleansing bar, and if you ring your bank and can stand to listen to the endless menus, you might get put onto a customer service specialist. A nurse is a wellness technician, and an in-flight service director used to be a hostie…Teams are everywhere, as is ‘passion’. Car companies manufacture automobiles ‘with…

Why you should avoid jargon in business writing was last modified on May 11th, 2016 by Proof Communications Editor
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How to illustrate your business writing

How to illustrate your business writing

What good is a children’s storybook without pictures? In a previous article, we talked about how story telling can help your business writing. Now we look at how you can illustrate, or bring colour, to your communications. What would Winnie the Pooh be without the pictures by EH Shepherd? Or Alice in Wonderland without Tenniel’s drawings? These classic children’s book illustrators visually interpreted those stories in a way that has made an indelible mark on how they have been read…

How to illustrate your business writing was last modified on May 4th, 2016 by Proof Communications Editor
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How to write a case study

How to write a case study

Case studies are a great way to present your credentials when writing a proposal, brochure, website copy, or writing a tender as they easily prove how your B2B service directly helps your clients. The best case studies are persuasive, interesting and true! They can be as short as a few lines or up to a page, but length really depends on how you’re using your case studies. Likewise, the tone and style of your case studies will change to suit…

How to write a case study was last modified on April 20th, 2016 by Proof Communications Editor
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How to respond to a Tender request

How to respond to a Request for Tender

What does the Tenderer really want? How to ask questions during the Tender process. Once you’ve read all the Request for Tender (RFT) documents supplied by the client, the chances are that you will have many questions! First, clients want the best possible responses to their RFTs. Sometimes they are open to potential tenderers making enquiries as this helps them to correct any omissions and / or errors in their RFTs, clarify the conditions of tendering or refine the scope of…

How to respond to a Request for Tender was last modified on April 15th, 2016 by Proof Communications Editor
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