English language

Dictionary

10 common English language mistakes

(Plus one you may think is an error, but isn’t). One of the wonderful features of the English language is its flexibility. We have a staggering range of words to choose from, whatever we are trying to say. And the ease with which we adopt new words and spread these around the world is a true example of globalisation. But writing in the English language is fraught with opportunities for error and confusion. Avoiding mistakes is not just a pastime…

10 common English language mistakes was last modified on June 30th, 2020 by Proof Communications Team
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What to do with a comma

Those little black squiggles cause endless confusion. To prevent your brain from frying, here’s some help on how to use commas to get your business messages across more clearly. For help with copywriting, proofreading or editing any of your business documents, contact Proof Communications on 02 8036 5532 or 0411 123 216 or head to the contact page.

What to do with a comma was last modified on June 16th, 2020 by Proof Communications Team
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Sentence Starters

Words to start sentences

Business writing can be hard enough but finding ways to make it ‘flow’ can make it seem even harder. How can you make your writing seem more like a conversation and less like a lecture? One easy way is to master the use of ‘sentence starters’ or ‘transition’ words and phrases. Here are some to get you into the swing of it all. (Just make sure to put a comma after the transition word and the subject of the sentence…

Words to start sentences was last modified on June 2nd, 2020 by Proof Communications Team
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Anagram

Friday Funny

Correct spelling is essential, mix up the letters of one word and the whole meaning is altered. For help with copywriting, proofreading or editing any of your business documents, contact Proof Communications on 02 8036 5532 or 0411 123 216 or head to the contact page.

Friday Funny was last modified on May 29th, 2020 by Proof Communications Team
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Learn

Clear business writing: getting the upper hand on upper case

Writers who feel compelled to use Capital Letters for no Apparent Reason make Everything seem Important or Formal, creating confusion for readers. Avoid incensing your audience by following these simple rules. Proper Nouns Proper nouns, which could refer to a place, person, event, or thing, are always capitalised in English. To name but a few, proper nouns include people’s names, names of businesses or organisations, place names, nationalities, cities and rivers, and months of the year. Interestingly, the four seasons…

Clear business writing: getting the upper hand on upper case was last modified on May 26th, 2020 by Proof Communications Team
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Mixed Letter

This week’s Friday Funny

Correct spelling is essential, one letter out of place can change the meaning of any writing dramatically. For help with copywriting, proofreading or editing any of your business documents, contact Proof Communications on 02 8036 5532 or 0411 123 216 or head to the contact page.  

This week’s Friday Funny was last modified on May 18th, 2020 by Proof Communications Team
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Anagrams

Never was a truer word spoken

One of the greatest wordsmiths in living memory, T.S. Eliot once said, ‘My name is only an anagram of toilets’. Typical self-effacing humour from such a brilliant writer, and testament to the power of anagrams to amuse, confuse and be just downright clever – as the following list so wonderfully demonstrates. For help with copywriting, proofreading or editing any of your business documents, contact Proof Communications on 02 8036 5532 or 0411 123 216 or head to the contact page.  

Never was a truer word spoken was last modified on May 13th, 2020 by Proof Communications Team
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Man with ????

Don’t get stuck on these commonly confused words

English is a tricky language: sometimes you need to select between words that sound the same, other times you need to decide whether you’re using a noun or a verb and pick the right spelling. And this isn’t easy for whole generations who weren’t taught English grammar at school! What’s more, American English can have a different way of doing things, which further muddies the waters! So, without wanting to bog you down in grammar, here’s how to avoid getting…

Don’t get stuck on these commonly confused words was last modified on August 28th, 2019 by Proof Communications Author
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UK flag

Could this be the only policy the UK Parliament will agree on this year? 

As the UK comes to terms with a new Prime Minister, officials for the new leader of the House of Commons are also grappling with change. It seems Jacob Rees-Mogg MP has wasted no time in issuing a style guide, making his views on language usage abundantly clear. ‘Lot’, ‘got’, ‘hopefully’ and ‘I am pleased to learn’ are just some of the many terms now strictly verboten. And heaven help anyone who uses a comma after ‘and’. So, are style…

Could this be the only policy the UK Parliament will agree on this year?  was last modified on August 14th, 2019 by Proof Communications Author
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English book

Quids in. A language lesson from the UK

Online comments from an unhappy UK shopper have made headlines this month. After visiting major retailer John Lewis, Donna Hewer posted a review criticising what she perceived to be a shop assistant’s overly informal manner. ‘Saying quid when quoting a price is uxeceptable in any shop. I expect better from John Lewis,’ said Donna. Her comments immediately made two things crystal clear: the language you use in a business scenario matters to your customers, and Donna struggles with the spelling…

Quids in. A language lesson from the UK was last modified on July 31st, 2019 by Proof Communications Author
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