Proofreading tips

writing sharp sentences

How to write sharper business content, even if you’re not a copywriter

Very often we write as we speak and, as a result, our written sentences are too long for people to digest quickly. This is especially true of reports, tenders and proposals. That’s not to say that sentences must always be short. There’s a school of thought that says business writing should comprise sentences of no more than seven words. Other people say 15 words max. That’s fine for direct mail, flyers, adverts, brochures and website copy. But when you’re explaining…

How to write sharper business content, even if you’re not a copywriter was last modified on August 28th, 2018 by Proof Communications Author
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Feed your website to keep it alive

Giving birth to a website is no mean feat. There are all the usual labour pains to contend with and arguments over what to name it. Some months later (and it’s often overdue), the actual delivery of your online brainchild is a rollercoaster of a time. But, at long last, you have a cute website you can call your very own. Job done. Or is it? Creating a website is one thing; keeping it alive is quite another. It’s easy…

Feed your website to keep it alive was last modified on February 28th, 2017 by Proof Communications Author
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simple business writing

Write tight: you’ll win the day

If anyone advises you to write the way you speak, feel free to beat them about the head with a rolled-up newspaper. If you took such advice, your writing would be riddled with space-filler words, repetition, and would almost certainly go off on any number of tangents. One common mistake is using overly long sentences. Here’s how to nip that particular problem in the bud. But before we go further, let’s acknowledge that sentences don’t always need to be short.…

Write tight: you’ll win the day was last modified on February 6th, 2017 by Proof Communications Author
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I Love Thee, My Ford…Oops! What I meant to say was…

No matter what kind of business you’re in, print mistakes happen. And when they do, the results can be hilarious. Enjoy this selection of heavenly howlers from church newsletters and noticeboards. Bertha Belch, a missionary from Africa, will be speaking tonight in the church hall. Come and hear Bertha Belch all the way from Africa. Next Thursday will be tryouts for the choir. They need all the help they can get. Ladies, don’t forget the rummage sale. It’s a chance…

I Love Thee, My Ford…Oops! What I meant to say was… was last modified on December 15th, 2016 by Proof Communications Author
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spelling errors, typos

The Impotence of Proofreading

The mistake (above) is one of the more obvious types of typos that catch our eye because it’s not only wrong, it’s entertaining. But so often mistakes aren’t obvious. Typos and grammatical errors are regularly missed because we scan rather than read a sentence; we see what we logically think or expect we should see. But don’t be fooled. Those pesky mistakes are out there! Take these typos we’ve picked up in recent times. A client’s global sustainability review confidently told…

The Impotence of Proofreading was last modified on November 28th, 2016 by Proof Communications Author
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A little thought goes a long way

How a little thought goes a long way

If you find writing a tender or any business document hard work, pity your reader. There is no one on earth that wants to spend longer than necessary reading business documents. When writing, the goal is to make it as easy, and quick, as possible for your reader to understand what you are saying. But how do you do this without getting bogged down? Well, here are a few easy rules to help you to structure what you want to…

How a little thought goes a long way was last modified on November 10th, 2016 by Proof Communications Author
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Proofreading

Five Rules for Perfect Proofreading

Read one character at a time. If you go too fast, you are likely to miss mistakes. Yes, you have to read slowly, even slower than one word at a time. By reading one character at a time you will find more mistakes than if you gloss over a whole word at once. You’ll see what’s really in the document rather than what your brain thinks is there. We all excel at jumping to conclusions and by drawing on our…

Five Rules for Perfect Proofreading was last modified on October 18th, 2016 by Proof Communications Author
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Proofreading, typos

“If I see a typo, I’ll leave without buying a thing”

UK firm, Global Lingo, conducted a study in 2013 which found that an astonishing 59% of respondents said they wouldn’t do business with a company whose marketing material had obvious errors; 74% of respondents said they pay close attention to website copy. Said one respondent, ‘If I see a typo, I’ll leave without buying a thing.’ For many consumers, marketing material littered with mistakes or poorly worded website copy is indicative of a business that cuts corners. They reason that,…

“If I see a typo, I’ll leave without buying a thing” was last modified on September 29th, 2016 by Proof Communications Author
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proofreading

Pain Free Proofreading

OK, so you’re pretty pleased with yourself. You’ve been under pressure to publish that business report for ages and it’s finally finished. Now there’s just time for a quick proofread and you’re done, right? Think again. When it comes to business writing, cutting proofreading corners is a form of self-sabotage and, like wearing socks with sandals, it’s just plain wrong. But you can make it an easier exercise all round by using these simple strategies. Leave it till last Don’t…

Pain Free Proofreading was last modified on September 21st, 2016 by Proof Communications Author
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Typos, business writing

French widow in every bedroom – the typos that got away

Laughter is not only good for the soul but a great way to start the day. So take a moment to enjoy this selection of howlers from Drummond Moir’s excellent book, “Just My Typo”. For coping with unexpected guests, it’s always a good plan to keep a few tons of sardines in the house. – Woman’s Weekly To call a broad from France, first dial 00. – Paris guidebook Later that same evening after a vain search all around the village, Mary found…

French widow in every bedroom – the typos that got away was last modified on September 15th, 2016 by Proof Communications Author
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