Writing tips

Business profile

How to write a business profile

It’s worth spending the time writing a strong business profile as you may be able to use or repurpose this content on your website, in your marketing materials, tenders or proposals, or across other professional documentation. Brainstorm your key messages The first thing to do is to brainstorm your key messages. Think about what your point of difference is, and why a customer should choose you over a competitor. Your differentiator could be your customer service, range of products or…

How to write a business profile was last modified on August 21st, 2019 by Proof Communications Author
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content is king

Content is king!

Many companies use it to connect with and engage their customers. However, producing it is not necessarily easy. Writing is a specialist skill and many marketing budgets do not stretch to an in-house resource… That’s where we can come in, lightening the load and writing content to your brief and brand specifications. Get bang for your buck with content you can use on your website, in newsletters and on social media. And with this taken care of, you can focus…

Content is king! was last modified on August 16th, 2019 by Proof Communications Author
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UK flag

Could this be the only policy the UK Parliament will agree on this year? 

As the UK comes to terms with a new Prime Minister, officials for the new leader of the House of Commons are also grappling with change. It seems Jacob Rees-Mogg MP has wasted no time in issuing a style guide, making his views on language usage abundantly clear. ‘Lot’, ‘got’, ‘hopefully’ and ‘I am pleased to learn’ are just some of the many terms now strictly verboten. And heaven help anyone who uses a comma after ‘and’. So, are style…

Could this be the only policy the UK Parliament will agree on this year?  was last modified on August 14th, 2019 by Proof Communications Author
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English book

Quids in. A language lesson from the UK

Online comments from an unhappy UK shopper have made headlines this month. After visiting major retailer John Lewis, Donna Hewer posted a review criticising what she perceived to be a shop assistant’s overly informal manner. ‘Saying quid when quoting a price is uxeceptable in any shop. I expect better from John Lewis,’ said Donna. Her comments immediately made two things crystal clear: the language you use in a business scenario matters to your customers, and Donna struggles with the spelling…

Quids in. A language lesson from the UK was last modified on July 31st, 2019 by Proof Communications Author
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Why you can’t be too careful about the words you choose

Why you can’t be too careful about the words you choose

Cultural appropriation? Just ask Kim Kardashian West. In these culturally sensitive times, only those businesses operating in an alternative space and time continuum would risk serious brand damage by falling foul of the PC police. Still, that didn’t stop one Kim Kardashian West recently choosing the name ‘Kimono’ for her latest range of shapewear. Claims of it being ‘a play on words’ fell on millions of deaf ears and the Kimono name vanished faster than you can say “My corset…

Why you can’t be too careful about the words you choose was last modified on July 23rd, 2019 by Thomas
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You can’t be too careful when it comes to the English language, here's how to save your bacon

How an innocent mistake can turn global relations nasty

You can’t be too careful when it comes to the English language, here’s how to save your bacon. There are times when, with no apparent effort at all, businesses can find themselves at the centre of a publicity nightmare after seemingly innocent statements assume a life of their own. Take Swiss bank UBS in China recently. An epidemic of African swine fever has had a hugely detrimental effect on China’s pig industry, with almost 100 million – some 20% of…

How an innocent mistake can turn global relations nasty was last modified on July 17th, 2019 by Thomas
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Write

Everyone can write, right?

Most can write, but most can’t write well! Writing is hard: it’s not only thinking up the ideas, but articulating them, linking them together and crafting them into a neat package. It takes practice – and sometimes many attempts to get right. Here are some of the traps that novice writers often fall into: Choosing difficult words: Overly formal language is usually a turn off for readers. If there is a simpler everyday alternative that you can use, then do…

Everyone can write, right? was last modified on July 1st, 2019 by Proof Communications Author
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Boring

Take the boring out of business writing

There’s nothing more dull than stiff, formal language, long, complicated sentences, and copy that’s thick with words that add no value. While those who adopt this heavy-duty style think it makes their writing weighty, it has the opposite effect: convoluted language tries to sound impressive but delivers little; it’s almost always vague, light on substance, heavy in obfuscation! It certainly doesn’t impress the reader who is left bewailing “What does this even mean?” And if you’re not writing for the…

Take the boring out of business writing was last modified on July 1st, 2019 by Proof Communications Author
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editing

Sometimes you need to murder your darlings

You’ve worked hard to articulate a point, to fine-tune a turn of phrase and now, of course, you’re emotionally attached to it. It’s painful to delete it, but what if it doesn’t serve your writing? What if it distracts from your key points? This is a challenge that all writers face, and one that was first expressed over a hundred years ago by Arthur Quiller-Couch. In his book ‘On the Art of Writing’, first published in 1916, he wrote: “Whenever…

Sometimes you need to murder your darlings was last modified on July 1st, 2019 by Proof Communications Author
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$50 note typo

When saving on a proofreader is a false economy

Now that the brouhaha over the RBA’s apparent inability to pick up a typo in an entire batch of newly-minted pineapples – the fruity vernacular for a $50 note – has died down, it’s timely to ask, “Just how could this have happened?” With remarkable ease, apparently. All it takes is an absence of the proofreading process. For the benefit of anyone who’s been holidaying on Mars, the recent currency fiasco which left Australia’s central bank distinctly red-faced occurred when…

When saving on a proofreader is a false economy was last modified on June 27th, 2019 by Proof Communications Author
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